Representing victims of serious harm and death

5 Killed in Truck Accident on I-65 in Lafayette, Indiana

It was with great sadness that I read of the fatal truck crash last night on I-65 outside Lafayette, Indiana. According to the news reports, five people were killed – including a child – when a semi-tractor trailer rear-ended a car that slowed or stopped on the highway as it approached a construction zone. There were seven vehicles involved in the crash, which occurred around midnight last night.

Road Construction Played a Part in the Big Truck Crash

 

Although the details of the crash are still being investigated, Sgt. Kim Riley of the Indiana State Police reported that collision occurred when a semi tractor trailer rear-ended a passenger vehicle, before slamming into additional cars. The semi then crashed into another semi-trailor truck and burst into flames.

"There are signs for about 20 miles down the interstate to tell you that you're coming into construction and that traffic is going to be slowing," Sgt. Riley said. "He apparently didn't see the signs, or wasn't paying attention, started to rear-end the vehicles, basically just plowed through the cars and ran into the rear-end of the second semi here."

Sadly, the driver of the truck that started this terrible crash died in the crash. This will make the initial investigation of the crash that much more difficult.

I-65 in Indiana is a Trucking Corridor

Fatal I-65 Truck Accident Near Lafayette, Indiana
Fatal I-65 Truck Accident Near Lafayette, Indiana

As a truck accident attorney, I am all too familiar with I-65 in Indiana. In 2012, I helped a family fight for justice, securing a $1.425 million settlement after they suffered from a terrible truck accident on I-65, just south of where this most recent crash occurred. While working that case, I discovered that I-65 is a major trucking corridor, with thousands of trucks crossing through Indiana each week.

The heavy truck traffic, combined with the fact that this stretch of I-65 in Indiana was under construction, should be a red flag to truck drivers to operate their 80,000 pound machines with even more caution. While it's too early to ascribe fault, early reports indicate that the truck driver who started the crash may be the proximate and immediate cause. (Read more on truck driver errors in our previous post on the five most common causes of trucking accidents.)

As my thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the deceased and injured, I shall continue my efforts to hold unsafe truck drivers and trucking companies to account for their negligence.