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The Growing Trend of Distracted Driving and its Negative Impact

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Smartphones, cell phones, PDAs, and tablets are part of everyday life and it seems every person has one or more these items. The number of people who use cell phones in the United States grew nearly 7 times from 1996 to 2009, rising from 40 million in 1996 to 276 million cell phone users in 2009. About 1 out of 9 people die and more than 1,000 people are injured every single day in collisions stemming from distracted driving, according to the National Safety Council.

Mobile Applications, Texting, and Talking are Among the Distractions

Software companies are putting more and more Mobile Applications on the market every day that can range from entertainment to GPS satellite services to keeping track of business meetings. Therefore, such Mobile Applications can only add to the potential to become distracted while driving, in addition to just handling a phone call or texting while driving.

A school bus driver, checking his email or Facebook account while driving; a truck driver checking the game score; or a driver using a rideshare Mobile Application such an the Uber App or the Lyft App may all potentially be hazardous distracted drivers. Therefore, some of these drivers are using their cell phones for work-related purposes, making their employer potentially liable for the collision.

Slower Reaction Times

Drivers who use cell phones even have slower reaction times, and more accidents, than drivers who are legally drunk.

  • A collision can happen in a matter of seconds, yet according to this study a driver can be distracted for an average of 27 seconds “after drivers put down the phone or stop fiddling with the navigation system.
  • Even hands-free systems or devices installed in some cars do not provide much help, as a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety shows that drives are still distracted while using such systems.
  • Moreover, another recent AAA Foundation study showed that teen drivers were distracted almost 25% of the total time they were behind the wheel.
  • Thus, when it comes to driving, electronic devices can become dangerous to those around us when they cause a focused, safe driver to become distracted. Based on the statistics, distracted driving is a growing hazard:
  • In 2013, 10% of all drivers in fatal collisions, from the age of 15 to 19 years old, involved distracted drivers;
  • In 2014, there were 3,179 people killed as a result of motor vehicle accidents involving distracted drivers. Also, there were some 431,000 more people injured in these types of incidents in the same year; and
  • A surprisingly 660,000 number of vehicles are being driven by a person using a handheld phone.

Consult an Attorney

If you or a loved one have been the victim of motor vehicle collision involving a distracted driver, call the lawyers at Whiting Law Group. Whiting Law Group takes a personal interest in every case that comes into our office. If you are looking for an attorney that will give you undivided individual attention, commitment to excellence, and use every possible resource available to help you win your case, then please contact Mr. Whiting directly for a free consultation toll-free at 1-877-936-7200 or by email at twhiting@wlglaw.net. There is no fee unless we win your case.

Whiting Law Group aggressively pursues the full measure of justice for our clients.  It requires that we are prepared and diligent. That preparation and diligence is not limited to our skills in the courtroom. It must begin immediately by conducting a comprehensive investigation and thorough analysis of the collision.  We pride ourselves on obtaining big firm results with a small office approach.  Our talented and experienced firm is able to effectively get the results you deserve in a timely fashion. Our clients are clients for life. We want to help you with any legal problem even if it is unrelated to your injury.

Sources:

http://letamericaknow.com/view_newsletter_ysk.php?memberid=21444&orderid=451&newsletterid=321&issueid=1604&subscriberid=756671

Ira H. Leesfield and Mark A. Sylvester, M. A., Bad Call, Trial August 2010, at17-20.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/study-hands-free-devices-distract-drivers-for-27seconds-after-use/2015/10/21/8fc67032-781b-11e5-a958-d889faf561dc_story.html

https://www.aaafoundation.org/distracted-driving