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Illinois Bill Raises Questions about Distracted Driving Definition

The passage of House Bill 1247 by the Illinois Senate has raised a number of questions about the most appropriate distracted driving definition. It has also forced a conversation about how government should address the issue. Mindful of the dangers that distracted driving and cell phone usage by drivers can cause, the truck accident attorneys at Whiting Law Group have been closely following these conversations. Late last month, the Illinois Senate on Thursday approved a bill that bans the use of hand-held cell phones while driving. The Senate passed the bill on a 34-20 vote. It will now return to the Illinois House of Representatives, which earlier approved the ban, for approval of an amendment added by the Senate stipulating that a first offense for violating the law would not constitute not a moving violation.

House Bill 1247 prohibits the use of hand-held cell phones while driving, although they could still be used if the phone is equipped with a hands-free device. Motorists could also use one-touch dialing and answering if the phone is so equipped.

The Distracted Driving Definition

As noted in an article by Doug Finke on the Rockford Register Star site, there is a wide debate among politicians and legislators about how government should address distracted driving. While using a hand-held phone is generally considered dangerous, how does it compare to distracts caused by in car conversations, adjusting the radio settings and the use of CB radios by truck drivers?

As a truck accident attorney, I am well aware that the leading cause of truck accidents is driver error. Distracted driving is among the most common mistakes by truck drivers.

I am pleased by the increased focus on a legislative approach to reducing the number of deaths and injuries caused by distracted driving.